Grappler’s Guide to Understanding Injuries

Injuries happen in all walks of life, particularly for athletes. An important concept to understand is how your body recovers and the phases of tissue healing. Phase 1: Inflammatory (Day 0-6): Following the injury your body will start the process to repair the damaged tissue. This results in an altered chemical state as your body …

Grip fighting and finger injuries

In all grappling arts the one who is able to establish their control has a significant advantage of their opponent. Grappling arts involving a kimono (jiu jitsu, judo, sambo etc..) often involve heavy grip fighting or kumi kata in japanese. Many matches are won based on who is able to achieve their intended grips to …

Grappler’s guide to Shoulder injuries

The shoulder has the most mobility of any joint, and unfortunately the more mobility a joint has the less inherent stability there is. Because the joint has less stability it is often a joint that gets injured in martial arts, whether from traumatic fall, joint lock or overuse. The shoulder complex is made up of …

Understanding Shoulder Locks

The shoulder, or glenohumeral joint, is the most mobile joint in the human body which may explain why it is an ideal joint to attack for offensive joint locks. There are a variety of submissions that attack the vulnerable joint: kimura, americana and omoplata. It is crucial to understand the kinesiology of the shoulder joint …

Inversion for Jiu Jitsu: How to invert safely

The concept of inverting is often used in sport jiu jitsu as a way to preserve guard, sweep and/or attack an opponent’s leg. While it is a useful movement for competitors is it safe? The safety of the technique is based on two principles: The proper technical skill and having adequate mobility to perform without …

Kneebars Explained

A kneebar works primarily by causing hyperextension of the knee (tibiofemoral joint). The average person will have around 5-10 degrees of extension and any more motion will challenge the soft tissue and ligamentous structures. Secondary mechanism of injury from a kneebar is posterior translation of the tibia on the femur. Structures that limit hyperextension: Ligaments: …